Proposal summaries

These are research proposals that have been approved by the ALSPAC exec. The titles include a B number which identifies the proposal and the date on which the proposals received ALSPAC exec approval.

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B3490 - Neurodevelopmental Disorders and Cardiometabolic Risk in ALSPAC Cohort - 31/03/2020

B number: 
B3490
Principal applicant name: 
Daniel Kerr | University of Glasgow (United Kingdom)
Co-applicants: 
Professor Helen Minnis, Prof Rebecca Reynolds, Dr Abigail Fraser
Title of project: 
Neurodevelopmental Disorders and Cardiometabolic Risk in ALSPAC Cohort
Proposal summary: 

Neurodevelopmental disorders (such as autism, ADHD, learning disability, and Tic Disorders) are lifelong conditions which begin in childhood and can have significant impacts on physical and mental health, and social well-being across the lifespan.
People with neurodevelopmental disorders have reduced life expectancy than people without such conditions (neurotypicals). Cardiovascular disease (such as heart attacks and strokes) is a significant contributor to this reduced life-expectancy. It is unclear why people with neurodevelopmental disorders are at increased risk of premature cardiovascular disease. Possible explanations include higher levels of cardiovascular risk factors (such as smoking, obesity, and physical inactivity) in people with neurodevelopmental disorders; difficulties in people with neurodevelopmental disorders accessing healthcare; and potentially shared biological mechanisms which contribute to causing both neurodevelopmental disorders and cardiovascular disease (such as over or under active immune systems).

This project aims to improve understanding of the association of neurodevelopmental disorders and cardiovascular disease. We aim to compare rates of cardiovascular risk factors (blood pressure, body mass index, cholesterol, glucose, insulin, and CRP- a measure of the immune system) and very early cardiovascular disease (as measured by the stiffness of arteries) between young adults (at aged 17 and 24) with neurodevelopmental disorders and without. We predict that young adults with neurodevleopmental disorders will have higher rates of both cardiovascular risk factors and very early cardiovascular disease when compared with neurotypical young adults. If this were to the case it would support a view that people with neurodevelopmental disorders are inherantly at increased risk of cardiovascular disease independent of their access to healthcare and would support policies for screening and early intervention in this group.

Impact of research: 
We hypothesis that young adults with neurodevelopmental conditions will have higher burdens of cardiovascular risk factors and subclinical cardiovascular disease than neurotypical young adults, we further hypothesis that there will be a dose response relationship between number of neurodevelopmental disorder and burden of cardiovascular risk factors and subclinical cardiovascular disease. If this is the case it will support that people with neurodevelopmental disorders are inherently at increased risk of cardiosvuarl disease independent of their access to healthcare which would support policies of early screening and preventative interventions in this group. Furthermore it would support further research to explore mechanisms of this association. If our hypothesis is not supported it would suggest that the differences in outcome are occurring later in the lifespan and would support further research in different samples (or in ALSPAC in the future) to elucidate these mechanisms.
Date proposal received: 
Friday, 27 March, 2020
Date proposal approved: 
Tuesday, 31 March, 2020
Keywords: 
Mental health - Psychology, Psychiatry, Cognition, Developmental disorders - autism, Hypertension, Mental health, Obesity, Statistical methods, Blood pressure, BMI, Cardiovascular, Statistical methods

B3491 - fasting insulin GWAS - 31/03/2020

B number: 
B3491
Principal applicant name: 
David A Hughes | University of Bristol MRC-IEU (UK)
Co-applicants: 
Dr. Laura Corbin, Dr Eleanor Wheeler
Title of project: 
fasting insulin GWAS
Proposal summary: 

A genome-wide association study of fasting insulin, proinsulin, glucagon, and Stumvoll insulin sensitivity index, and insulin fold change to identify the genetic architecture of these traits.

Impact of research: 
data estimates will be shared with a large consortium which will prove vital in estimate precision and power.
Date proposal received: 
Sunday, 29 March, 2020
Date proposal approved: 
Tuesday, 31 March, 2020
Keywords: 
Genetic epidemiology (including association studies and mendelian randomisation), Diabetes, GWAS, BMI, Genetic epidemiology, Genomics, Genome wide association study

B3489 - Violent and nonviolent crime under the influence of alcohol - 27/03/2020

B number: 
B3489
Principal applicant name: 
Gemma Hammerton | University of Bristol (UK)
Co-applicants: 
Dr Jon Heron, Ieuan Evans
Title of project: 
Violent and nonviolent crime under the influence of alcohol
Proposal summary: 

Strong associations exist between alcohol consumption and crime, but the extent to which these associations are causal is unclear. One hypothesised explanation is that the pharmacological effects of alcohol reduce cognitive capacity, and risk perception leading to an increased risk of committing a crime while under the influence of alcohol. We propose to examine the extent to which associations detected are causal using data collected at the ALSPAC focus clinic at age 24 years on committing crime while sober (which cannot be due to the situational effects of intoxication) and while under the influence of alcohol. We will examine the effects of alcohol consumption (prevalence, frequency, quantity) on violent and nonviolent crime, compare the association between drinking and engaging in crime while sober to the association between drinking and crime, and investigate whether cognitive factors (such as impulsivity, poor working memory and poor emotion recognition) increase the risk of crime while under the influence of alcohol.

Impact of research: 
This research is for a dissertation project within the MSc Epidemiology. It will therefore result in an electronic poster to be presented at a student research symposium, a dissertation report and a published paper. A better understanding of the extent to which the association between alcohol consumption and crime is causal will improve prevention and intervention strategies for criminal behaviour in young people. Identifying cognitive factors that increase the risk of crimes being committed under the influence of alcohol will improve targeted invention strategies.
Date proposal received: 
Thursday, 26 March, 2020
Date proposal approved: 
Friday, 27 March, 2020
Keywords: 
Epidemiology, Addiction - e.g. alcohol, illicit drugs, smoking, gambling, etc., Behaviour - e.g. antisocial behaviour, risk behaviour, etc., Cognitive impairment, Statistical methods, Cognition - cognitive function, Statistical methods

B3488 - Mental health and educational outcomes in high-risk children - 02/04/2020

B number: 
B3488
Principal applicant name: 
Anita Thapar | Cardiff Univeristy
Co-applicants: 
Prof Gordon Harold, Prof Leslie Leve, Dr Lucy Riglin, Prof Anna Vignoles, Prof Emla Fitzsimons, Prof Chris Taylor
Title of project: 
Mental health and educational outcomes in high-risk children
Proposal summary: 
Impact of research: 
Date proposal received: 
Thursday, 26 March, 2020
Date proposal approved: 
Thursday, 26 March, 2020
Keywords: 
Mental health - Psychology, Psychiatry, Cognition, Mental health, Statistical methods, Mental health; education

B3486 - Mendelian randomisation analysis of the relationship between body composition BMI and related variables and Metabolon data - 24/03/2020

B number: 
B3486
Principal applicant name: 
Nicholas Timpson | University of Bristol (UK)
Co-applicants: 
Mr Wenxin , Dr David Hughes, Dr Laura Corbin, Mr Matt Lee
Title of project: 
Mendelian randomisation analysis of the relationship between body composition (BMI and related variables) and Metabolon data.
Proposal summary: 

This work sits as part of a larger project to undertake a one sample MR analysis of the relationship between BMI and metabolon metabolite data in the Flemish Gut Fora Project.

The application here is to generate a training set of data for Wenxin (MSc student) from existing ALSPAC metabolon data. The aim here is to randomly select a sub-set of the ALSPAC BMI GRS Metabolon data - not for analytical/inferential worth, but for the purpose of allowing the student to develop scripts and analyses before getting hold fo FGFP data in full.

The proposal here would be fore direct users (included here) to randomly extract a sub-set of ALSPAC Metabolon data, to assign a random amount of error to that data set and to remove any ID reference from that data set. This dummy data set would then be used for the express purpose of understanding the format and nature of Metabolon metabolite data. Dr Hughs, Corbin or PhD student Matt Lee will be able to bring these data together (with a small set of relevant covariables). This should not generate burden for the ALSPAC data team.

Impact of research: 
It will allow immediate use of the the collaborator (Flemish Gut Flora Project) data when this becomes available. Importantly this will also provide an immediate training data set for Mr Wan.
Date proposal received: 
Tuesday, 24 March, 2020
Date proposal approved: 
Tuesday, 24 March, 2020
Keywords: 
Epidemiology, Obesity, Metabolomics, BMI

B3485 - Polygenic risk score prediction of BMI/adiposity/obesity in ALPSAC and longitudinal outcome data - 24/03/2020

B number: 
B3485
Principal applicant name: 
Nicholas Timpson | University of Bristol (UK)
Co-applicants: 
Dr Kaitlin Wade, Professor Ruth Loos, Dr Roelof Smit
Title of project: 
Polygenic risk score prediction of BMI/adiposity/obesity in ALPSAC and longitudinal outcome data
Proposal summary: 
Impact of research: 
Date proposal received: 
Tuesday, 24 March, 2020
Date proposal approved: 
Tuesday, 24 March, 2020
Keywords: 
Genetic epidemiology (including association studies and mendelian randomisation), Obesity, Statistical methods, BMI

B3487 - ALSPAC response to COVID-19 pandemic - 31/03/2020

B number: 
B3487
Principal applicant name: 
Nic Timpson | ALSPAC (United Kingdom)
Co-applicants: 
Professor Deborah Lawlor, Professor George Davey Smith
Title of project: 
ALSPAC response to COVID-19 pandemic
Proposal summary: 

In response to the COVID-19 pandemic we plan to send two standalone questionnaires out to ALSPAC participants to determine potential transmission (through questions on travel and symptoms) before the peak that is starting in the UK now. Exact content of the questionnaires is to be agreed but will also likely include measures of other symptoms (not just COVID but e.g. seasonal flu, anxiety), mental health (depression, well being), patterns of response to the pandemic (e.g. self isolating, working at home etc) and what indivdual's concerns are (financial, health, etc). We will follow up with our standard annual questionnaire to determine long term impact.

Impact of research: 
It may add to the evidence on the transmission of the virus. Will provide vital social information on how a well described and phenotyped population dealt with the unprecedented pandemic and the societal consequences.
Date proposal received: 
Tuesday, 24 March, 2020
Date proposal approved: 
Tuesday, 24 March, 2020
Keywords: 
Epidemiology, Infection, Immunity

B3471 - Using novel data collection approaches to enhance the ALSPAC resource - 20/03/2020

B number: 
B3471
Principal applicant name: 
Louise AC Millard | MRC IEU
Co-applicants: 
Title of project: 
Using novel data collection approaches to enhance the ALSPAC resource
Proposal summary: 

Cohorts like ALSPAC typically collect data on their participants over several years, but since data collection is usually both expensive and burdensome these data collection events tend to take place every few years, measuring or recording information at a particular instance in time e.g. via questionnaires or clinic visits. Hence, these data contain a limited amount of information on phenotypic variability across the life-course, and restricts the research questions that can be asked using these data. There is much more scope to exploit existing and emerging technologies to collect data ‘continuously’ over the longer term in cost-effective and less burdensome ways.

Digital health devices have been successfully used to collect data on specific traits over a number of days (e.g. physical activity measured with accelerometers), but these devices tend to each focus on particular traits such that collecting data in this way is expensive (having to buy specific devices to collect specific phenotypes), and many types of phenotypes do not lend themselves to this type of data collection, in particular, those that can only (currently) be collected via self-report. Recent advances in artificial intelligence and voice recognition technologies means it is now feasible to use voice-based systems to collect self-reported data continuously over several days or weeks in a less burdensome way. However, to date, voice-based data collection has not been used in epidemiology.

A second potentially valuable source of data comes from our pervasive use of the world wide web (the ‘web’). ALSPAC has included items in questionnaires (e.g. “Have you sought help or advice regarding your sex life from the internet in the last year?”), but collecting web usage information passively using a technological approach over a potentially long period of time (weeks, months or even years), has the potential to provide a very large and currently untapped source of health-related information, if collected in ALSPAC.

In this study we aim to assess feasibility and acceptability of a voice-based approach to data collection and passive collection of web usage data. We then plan to collect these data in ALSPAC participants.

Impact of research: 
To raise the profile of ALSPAC as a leader of ‘deep’ innovative methods of data collection in epidemiology cohorts studies that will allow new research questions to be answered, through exploiting existing and emerging technologies. To demonstrate the feasibility and value of these technological approaches for epidemiological research. This will provide novel ‘deep’ data, to widen the scope of research questions that can be answered with the ALSPAC resource, to further understanding of the causes and consequences of traits and disease.
Date proposal received: 
Thursday, 19 March, 2020
Date proposal approved: 
Friday, 20 March, 2020
Keywords: 
Statistics/methodology, Statistical methods, Voice-controlled data collection on wearable devices, using systems like Amazon Alexa and the Google Assistant. Technological approach to tracking web usage., Nutrition - breast feeding, diet, Statistical methods

B3484 - The mediating effect of inflammation on the association between genetic risk for psychiatric disorders and psychiatric outcomes - 24/03/2020

B number: 
B3484
Principal applicant name: 
Philippa Lilford | University of Bristol, Population Health Sciences (United Kingdom)
Co-applicants: 
Dr Hannah Jones, Professor Stanley Zammit, Professor Jeremy Hall
Title of project: 
The mediating effect of inflammation on the association between genetic risk for psychiatric disorders and psychiatric outcomes
Proposal summary: 

Inflammation has been implicated as a potential mechanism in the development of psychiatric illnesses such as schizophrenia and major depressive disorder (MDD). However, it is not fully understood whether inflammation causes mental illness, whether behaviours associated with mental illness cause increased inflammation, or whether mental illness and inflammation share common risk factors. This project therefore aims to i) investigate whether genetic risk for psychiatric disorders is associated with inflammation and ii) investigate whether inflammation explains the associations between genetic risk for psychiatric disorders and mental health outcomes in adolescence and early adulthood.
Results of this project will further improve our understanding of the role of inflammation in pathways to mental ill health.

Impact of research: 
This project will increase our understanding of the role of inflammation in pathways to mental ill health. Understanding the causal pathway between genetic liability and psychiatric outcomes is an important step to understand what potential prophylactic and therapeutic interventions may be targeted in the future.
Date proposal received: 
Monday, 16 March, 2020
Date proposal approved: 
Friday, 20 March, 2020
Keywords: 
Mental health - Psychology, Psychiatry, Cognition, Mental health, Statistical methods, Genetic epidemiology

B3483 - Assciations between eating behaviours and body mass index in the ALSPAC cohort at 25 - 16/03/2020

B number: 
B3483
Principal applicant name: 
Julian Hamilton-Shield | TLS/PPS/ Bristol Biomedical Research Centre (Nutrition)
Co-applicants: 
Jeff Brunstrom, Annika Flynn, Nick Timpson
Title of project: 
Assciations between eating behaviours and body mass index in the ALSPAC cohort at 25
Proposal summary: 

Eating behaviours describe how people eat rather than what they eat. We believe that some current, common eating behaviours are part of the problem causing an increase in obesity levels in the UK and elsewhere. We put some questions in to the ALSPAC questionnaire for participants aged 25 years that asked about how fast they ate their meals, with whom and in front of what items if any of technology (such as computers, TV etc.). We will examine this information to see if any such behaviours tend towards increased body mass index in the cohort. This information may add to our clinical advice when counselling people with excess weight how to lose or maintain weight loss.

Impact of research: 
The findings will have direct relevance to our understanding of how eating behaviours influence weight. Current international weight management advice centres on getting people to actively reduce calories consumed and increase activity levels: these strategies are failing. We wish to build the evidence base that how we eat also influences daily calorie intake (subconsciously) and that addressing such behaviours will allow people to better manage calorie consumption which in public health terms is very cost effective.
Date proposal received: 
Tuesday, 10 March, 2020
Date proposal approved: 
Monday, 16 March, 2020
Keywords: 
Obesity, Obesity, BMI

B3481 - The relationship between socioeconomic deprivation psychiatric distress and persistence of smoking in pregnant women - 10/03/2020

B number: 
B3481
Principal applicant name: 
Lorna Hardy | University of Exeter (UK)
Co-applicants: 
Dr Lee Hogarth
Title of project: 
The relationship between socioeconomic deprivation, psychiatric distress, and persistence of smoking in pregnant women.
Proposal summary: 

Only a small proportion of pregnant individuals will continue to smoke during their pregnancy. Identifying the key traits which predict this behaviour will allow the development of more efficient screening procedures and interventions for this vulnerable group, improving outcomes for both mother and foetus. While both psychological vulnerabilities (such as depression) and socioeconomic risk factors (such as material deprivation) have been considered individually in their relationship with smoking during pregnancy, the relative importance of psychological versus socioeconomic factors has not been determined. In addition, very few studies have considered the complex inter-relationships between socioeconomic status (SES) and psychological wellbeing, and how these might contribute to smoking in pregnancy. The purpose of the present project is to use the ALSPAC dataset to address these two issues. Pregnant women in this dataset will be classed as either continuing smokers (smoked prior to pregnancy and continued during second and/or third trimesters), quit smokers (smoked prior to pregnancy but not during second or third trimesters), and never smokers (did not smoke prior to pregnancy or during pregnancy). Differences between these groups in psychological variables (depression, anxiety, and experience of stressful events during pregnancy) and socioeconomic variables (educational attainment, financial difficulties and neighbourhood deprivation) will be tested using multiple logistic regression. The second phase of this project will use network outcome analysis to map the complex inter-relationships between psychological and socioeconomic risk factors and smoking in pregnancy. This will allow us to identify the best targets for intervention.

Impact of research: 
The broad impact of this programme of research would be to encourage psychological researchers to engage to a greater extent with the socioeconomic aspects of their work, such that socioeconomic status is considered in parity to psychological wellbeing in models of addiction and interventions. This would represent a significant ideological shift within the addiction field. A range of academic groups will benefit from the insights provided by the novel research in this project including: 1.Addiction theorists who seek to characterise the individual differences that contribute to tobacco dependence vulnerability, especially in pregnancy, or who seek to articulate general theoretical models of addiction. 2.Addiction theorists who are interested in behavioural economic models, in particular the role of deprivation and lack of alternative reinforcement as a key risk factor for addiction. 3.Researchers and clinical psychologists who are actively engaged in developing screening procedures and preventative therapies for substance dependence. 4.A number of psychological societies - including the Society for the Study of Addiction, the College on Problems of Drug Dependence, and the APA Society of Addiction Psychology- who seek to define mechanisms underpinning addiction. 5.A number of clinically-facing academic societies – including the British Thoracic Society, the Respiratory Medicine Section of The Royal Society of Medicine, and the Royal College of Psychiatrists – who seek to minimise the burden of disease stemming from smoking and addiction. 6.Antenatal services and general practitioners for whom this research would contribute to the development of screening procedures and preventative interventions for individuals identified as at high risk of smoking during pregnancy.
Date proposal received: 
Saturday, 7 March, 2020
Date proposal approved: 
Tuesday, 10 March, 2020
Keywords: 
Social Science, Addiction - smoking. Psychiatric co-morbidity - depression, anxiety., Logistic regression; network outcome analysis, Smoking; addiction; pregnancy; depression; anxiety; socioeconomic markers

B3479 - The determinants and burden of gastrointestinal infection a tale of two generations - 10/03/2020

B number: 
B3479
Principal applicant name: 
Mara Violato | Health Economics Research Centre, University of Oxford (United Kingdom)
Co-applicants: 
Dr Daniel Hungerford, Professor Miren Iturriza-Gomara, Professor Noel McCarthy, Professor Benjamin Barr
Title of project: 
The determinants and burden of gastrointestinal infection: a tale of two generations?
Proposal summary: 

Gastrointestinal infections are common, with 1 in 4 people in the UK population experiencing an episode each year, which causes an estimated annual cost to the individuals, the National Health Service and the wider economy of £1.5 billion. This research will take a life-course approach to the assessment of the causes and consequences of gastrointestinal infections in the community, from early childhood into early adulthood – continuing into the next generation (ALSPAC-G2 study: Children of the Children of the 90s). This will allow us to provide important insights into changes in causes and consequences of gastrointestinal infections across the individual life-course but also over time at the population level. The findings can then inform public health interventions to reduce the burden of gastrointestinal infections, especially among the most vulnerable groups.

Impact of research: 
Greater understanding of risk factors for and the burden of gastrointestinal infections in the community across the individual life-course but also over time at the population level. The first evaluation of the impact of paediatric rotavirus vaccination on mild community diarrhoea in the UK. Guidance for developing community based/led gastrointestinal infection surveillance platforms.
Date proposal received: 
Friday, 6 March, 2020
Date proposal approved: 
Saturday, 7 March, 2020
Keywords: 
Health Economics, Gastrointestinal, Statistical methods, Health economics, life-course approach, infections

B3480 - The Maternal Diet Diversity Index during Pregnancy and Allergy outcomes in the child - 10/03/2020

B number: 
B3480
Principal applicant name: 
Carina Venter | University of Colorado/Childrens Hospital Colorado (USA)
Co-applicants: 
Dana Dabelea
Title of project: 
The Maternal Diet Diversity Index during Pregnancy and Allergy outcomes in the child
Proposal summary: 

What mothers eat during pregnancy may affect the development of allergy in their babies and children. This study will use data from two cohorts: the Healthy Start cohort and the ALSPAC cohort. The study will learn if a novel comprehensive measure of maternal diet during pregnancy affects development of eczema, food allergy, seasonal allergies/hay fever/allergic rhinitis and asthma in chidden. The new knowledge will help families and clinicians to eventually prevent the onset and progression of allergy.

Impact of research: 
This study is at the cutting edge of advancing our understanding of the critical role of maternal dietary intake in the etiology of childhood allergic diseases. Understanding these factors will reveal what kind of maternal diet is associated with allergy outcomes in offspring. The hope is that this study will set the stage for randomized controlled trials in pregnancy for the prevention of allergic disease in offsprings well as further studies to support the possible mechanisms of action.
Date proposal received: 
Saturday, 7 March, 2020
Date proposal approved: 
Saturday, 7 March, 2020
Keywords: 
Epidemiology, Allergy, Statistical methods, Allergy

B3477 - At the intersection of autism and psychosis An investigation of causal pathways developmental trajectories and phenotypic outc - 03/03/2020

B number: 
B3477
Principal applicant name: 
Dheeraj Rai | Centre of Academic Mental Health, University of Bristol (United Kingdom)
Co-applicants: 
Miss Christina Dardani, Professor Stan Zammit, Dr Sarah Sullivan, Dr Hannah Jones
Title of project: 
At the intersection of autism and psychosis: An investigation of causal pathways, developmental trajectories and phenotypic outc
Proposal summary: 

Autism is a chronic condition, arising early in childhood and characterized by two main symptoms: difficulties in social communication/interactions and repetitive behaviours. Sometimes, people with autism also have psychotic illness (e.g. hearing voices or feeling paranoid). The reasons this happens is still unknown. There are several possible explanations:
a. Specific autism-related symptoms, such as repetitive behaviours and restricted interests, might be risk factors for developing psychosis later in life,
b. Genetics of autism might predispose the affected individuals to psychosis later in life,
c. Adverse life events, frequently occurring in people with autism, such as stigmatisation or bullying, might lead to psychosis.
We will investigate these explanations using genetic, clinic and questionnaire data from the ALSPAC cohort. Understanding the reasons why some people with autism develop psychosis is an important step towards developing appropriate prevention strategies and offer adequate psychosocial support to the affected individuals and their families.

Impact of research: 
Date proposal received: 
Monday, 2 March, 2020
Date proposal approved: 
Tuesday, 3 March, 2020
Keywords: 
Mental health - Psychology, Psychiatry, Cognition, Developmental disorders - autism, GWAS, Genetic epidemiology

B3476 - Validating the CIS-R for use as an online tool - 06/03/2020

B number: 
B3476
Principal applicant name: 
Hannah Sallis | University of Bristol
Co-applicants: 
Dr Rebecca Pearson
Title of project: 
Validating the CIS-R for use as an online tool
Proposal summary: 

The Clinical Interview Schedule – Revised (CIS-R) is a structured diagnostic measure developed from the Clinical Interview Schedule (CIS), a standardised interview designed to assess common mental disorders among community settings. The CIS was designed for use by clinical interviewers and required expert judgement to determine psychopathology. The CIS was standardised to enable interviewers without this expert knowledge to administer, the resulting CIS-R can thus be self-completed and returns results comparable to those from standardized interviews. The CIS-R has been validated across a number of populations and ages, and studies suggest that the instrument remains valid across a number of cultural settings and age groups. To date, little work has been done to validate the CIS-R administered using different modes of assessment.

Previously the CIS-R has been administered to ALSPAC participants via a computerised assessment during clinic time. To minimise participant burden during clinic time and maximise response rate to the CIS-R, it has been suggested that the assessment could be completed online, outside of the clinic. The CIS-R has not currently been validated as an online task, therefore we propose to investigate whether responses to this measure differ according to the setting in which it is completed, and whether it remains a valid diagnostic measure when completed online outside of the clinic setting.

Impact of research: 
If found to be valid, the CIS-R could be assessed online in future waves of data collection to help minimise participant burden during clinic days, and will also provide a more flexible approach for obtaining reliable diagnoses of common mental health disorders.
Date proposal received: 
Friday, 28 February, 2020
Date proposal approved: 
Monday, 2 March, 2020
Keywords: 
Mental health - Psychology, Psychiatry, Cognition, Mental health, Statistical methods, Psychology - personality

B3475 - Teachers psychological processes - 05/03/2020

B number: 
B3475
Principal applicant name: 
Lisa Kim | University of York (United Kingdom)
Co-applicants: 
Dr Irena Buric, TBD
Title of project: 
Teachers' psychological processes
Proposal summary: 

Despite the common belief that teachers can impact various aspects of students' lives, the empirical evidence on the breadth and strength of their influence is relatively unclear. This project aims to examine the relative strength of the influence of teachers' characteristics and behaviours as perceived by multiple raters (i.e., teachers themselves, students, and parents) on multiple experiences and outcomes associated with the teacher (e.g., job satisfaction) and their students (e.g., academic achievement).

Impact of research: 
The project will provide fundamental understanding into which teachers’ characteristics are most associated with various aspects of teachers' and students’ experiences and outcomes. Furthermore, the longitudinal effects of being instructed by a teacher will be examined. The findings can serve as a basis for designing and implementing prevention and intervention strategies in order to promote teachers’ occupational well-being, their performance, and quality of education in general.
Date proposal received: 
Tuesday, 25 February, 2020
Date proposal approved: 
Tuesday, 25 February, 2020
Keywords: 
Social Science, Statistical methods, Psychology - personality, Social science, Statistical methods

B3474 - Exploration of the relationship between social cognition and PTSD within the ALSPAC cohort - 26/02/2020

B number: 
B3474
Principal applicant name: 
Stan Zammit | University of Bristol
Co-applicants: 
Dr Chantelle Wiseman
Title of project: 
Exploration of the relationship between social cognition and PTSD within the ALSPAC cohort
Proposal summary: 

Social cognition has been hypothesised to be important in the development of PTSD (1). Previous research has shown that individuals with PTSD have a variety of social cognitive deficits (2), but whether these existed prior to the development of PTSD has not yet been determined. Furthermore, it is not clear whether social cognitive deficits increase risk of trauma exposure, whether trauma causes social cognitive deficits, and whether social cognitive deficits mediate or moderate the relationship between trauma and PTSD

Impact of research: 
This work, in combination with the clinical study that Chantelle is also doing as part of her PhD, aims to determine whether social cognitive deficits predict PTSD and response to therapy, and whether such deficits are causal in nature. If so, then this could inform the development of interventions aimed to address deficits in social cognition as part of the approach to treating PTSD. Direct impacts form this work specifically will likely be research related (publications and presentations).
Date proposal received: 
Tuesday, 25 February, 2020
Date proposal approved: 
Tuesday, 25 February, 2020
Keywords: 
Epidemiology, Mental health, Statistical methods, Development, PTSD; Social cognition

B3473 - Metabolomic quality control and association analyses - 24/02/2020

B number: 
B3473
Principal applicant name: 
Nicholas Timpson | MRC IEU (United Kingdom)
Co-applicants: 
Mr Matthew Lee, Dr Laura Corbin, Dr David Hughes, Dr Kaitlin Wade
Title of project: 
Metabolomic quality control and association analyses
Proposal summary: 

Metabolites are the ultimate end-point of a biological process and are therefore seen as a link between genotype and phenotype. Assigning individual metabolite changes to diseases is difficult because of the complexity of their interrelationships. Prior to analysis quality control of metabolomics data is required. We have developed a package that automates these quality control steps. We will use the raw metabolomic data as a use case for our package.

Body composition is known to affect metabolite concentrations. These changes may be implicated in disease development. Following quality control we will use the metabolomic data to investigate the relationship between metabolites and different body composition traits.

Impact of research: 
Evaluation of metabolite quality control package. Greater understanding of the relationship between metabolites and body composition.
Date proposal received: 
Monday, 24 February, 2020
Date proposal approved: 
Monday, 24 February, 2020
Keywords: 
Epidemiology, Obesity, Metabolomics, Statistical methods, BMI, Genetics, Mendelian randomisation, metabolomics

B3472 - Are knee DXA biomarkers related to lower limb biomechanics and gait in women with and without knee osteoarthritis - 05/03/2020

B number: 
B3472
Principal applicant name: 
Aliya Sarmanova | Musculoskeletal Research Unit, Translational Health Sciences, Bristol Medical School, University of Bristol (UK)
Co-applicants: 
Professor Jonathan Tobias, Professor Nicholas Timpson, Professor Richie Gill
Title of project: 
Are knee DXA biomarkers related to lower limb biomechanics and gait in women with and without knee osteoarthritis?
Proposal summary: 
Impact of research: 
Date proposal received: 
Wednesday, 19 February, 2020
Date proposal approved: 
Sunday, 23 February, 2020
Keywords: 
Epidemiology, Bone disorders - arthritis, osteoporosis, Computer simulations/modelling/algorithms, Medical imaging, Statistical methods, Bones (and joints)

B3470 - predicting asthma beyond childhood - 18/02/2020

B number: 
B3470
Principal applicant name: 
ABDAL JABBAR FARHAN | SOUTHAMPTON UNIVERSITY
Co-applicants: 
S. HASAN ARSHAD
Title of project: 
predicting asthma beyond childhood
Proposal summary: 

using same principle of pediatric asthma risk scores to predict asthma in childhood I have created risk factors to predict asthma at age 18 and 26 years old

Impact of research: 
Novel finding can help to tackle the significant risk factors of adult asthma early in childhood.
Date proposal received: 
Tuesday, 18 February, 2020
Date proposal approved: 
Tuesday, 18 February, 2020
Keywords: 
ALLERGY, PULMONOLOGY, Respiratory - asthma, Statistical methods, Statistical methods

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